Drivers from Oneida, Chippewa join 401 convoy in support of BC pipeline protest

First Nation groups from the London region joined a rolling blockade travelling along the 401 Friday to show support for protestors arrested in British Columbia earlier in the week.

About a dozen vehicles from First Nations in southwestern Ontario left at dawn to join the convoy

About a dozen vehicles left the Oneida Nation of Thames territory, outside London, travelling slowing along highways 402, 401 and 403. (Provided: Brandon Doxtator)

First Nation groups from the London region joined a rolling blockade travelling along the 401 Friday to show support for protestors arrested in British Columbia earlier in the week. 

 About a dozen vehicles left the Oneida territory before dawn travelling first on highway 402, then onto the 401 at 60 km/hr. They took over two lanes causing major slowdowns for morning commuters. 

"We're doing this rolling blockade as a peaceful reminder to Canadians that First Nation people have rights to the land," said Brandon Doxtator, who was in one of the vehicles. 

Other First Nations across Ontario and Quebec also joined the protest that's in response to the arrest of 14 people in Northern B.C. at the Gidimt'en camp where a barrier was set up to bar a pipeline company from access to land. 

A deal was reached Thursday that will allow the company access to do pre-construction work. Still, the arrests have angered people across the country.  
Flying a flag along the route to show support for B.C. groups (Submitted by Brandon Doxtator)

"We want to condemn the actions of the RCMP in forcibly removing First Nation people from their traditional territory," Doxtator said. 

Before leaving Oneida, drivers did meet with OPP officers to explain their plan. Police have since issued a warning to motorist to be aware and to slow down for the group. 

The convoy from Oneida was heading to the Six Nation territory, south of Brantford, where a rally was planned for later on Friday.