London·Video

Gmaamikwenmigoo! Meet the winner of the Anishinaabemowin spelling-bee

A spelling bee is sure to fire up the nerves and when it's in your ancestor's language, there's real pressure. Angela Stacey was the winner of an Anishinaabemowin competition held Saturday at Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. 

'This was the most I've ever put into my language and I'm proud of myself'

Angela Stacey won a spelling bee where she had to master 100 common phrases in Anishinaabemowin. (Liny Lamberink/ CBC News)

A spelling bee is sure to fire up the nerves and when it's in the language of your ancestors, there's real pressure.

Angela Stacey was the winner of an Anishinaabemowin competition held Saturday at Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. The prize? $5,000! But the real win for Stacey was learning a language she wants her daughter to speak. 

So how hard is Anishinaabemowin to learn? 

Angela Stacey tells London Morning what learning her language means to her. She recently won top prize in an Anishinaabemowin speaking competition. 0:56

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.