London·Video

Did you know you can feed your Christmas tree to a goat?

Dragging a Christmas tree to the curb can be a sad moment, marking the end of another holiday season.

It's good for the digestive system, said Laughing Goat Yoga Studio owner Susan Ashley

Goats can eat your Christmas tree

3 years ago
Duration 0:42
At the Laughing Goat Yoga Studio in Thorndale, Ont., goats get a holiday treat when it's time to take down the Christmas tree.

Dragging a Christmas tree to the curb can be a sad moment, marking the end of another holiday season.

What if disposing of your tree could be a joyful moment instead? What if you could offer your tree to a goat, who will devour its needles with highly photographable reckless abandon?

"It's a bit of a free for all," explained Susan Ashley, owner of Laughing Goat Yoga Studio in Thorndale, moments before throwing her own tree into the goat pen.

"They pounce on it, and they'll eat it within minutes … it's a quick process. They're very food motivated animals. So whenever food is on the scene, they lose their minds," Ashley said of the half dozen goats on her property. 

Susan Ashley, the owner of Laughing Goat Yoga Studio, said her herd of six goats will eat her Christmas tree within minutes. "It's a quick process, they're very food motivated animals." (Liny Lamberink/CBC London)

It's the second time she's feeding them her Christmas tree.

Ashley said the needles are good for the goats' digestive system.

"If people want to bring their trees for the goats, that's no problem. So long as they call first, so I'm here," she said, adding that the best types of trees are dried out and crunchy. 

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