London

If you attended Black Lives Matter protest, self-monitor for COVID-19

An estimated 10,000 Londoners packed Victoria Park on Saturday to protest against systemic racism. While most people present wore face masks in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19, the large gathering has prompted health officials to ask attendees to self-monitor for symptom for a 14-day period. 

The MLHU reported six new cases over the weekend.

Thousands of people took to the streets in downtown London, Ont. to march against racism and violence toward black people on Saturday. The demonstration echoed hundreds of rallies taking place across the country and in the U.S. (Sofia Rodriguez/CBC)

An estimated 10,000 Londoners packed Victoria Park on Saturday to protest against systemic racism. While most people present wore face masks in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19, the large gathering has prompted health officials to ask attendees to self-monitor for symptom for a 14-day period. 

"Anyone who wants a COVID-19 test, especially at the slightest hint of symptoms, should visit one of London's two assessment centres at the earliest possible opportunity," said Mayor Ed Holder in a statement. 

"We need to ensure everyone who attended Saturday's protest is healthy, and able to contribute to the important work involved in dismantling systemic racism," he added. 

People looking to get tested can go to either of the city's two assessment centres: Carling Heights Optimist Community Centre, which is open seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., or Oakridge Arena, which operates Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Meanwhile, the Middlesex-London Health Unit (MLHU) reported six new cases of COVID-19 this weekend, all which were reported Saturday. 

Of the new cases, one of them is linked to a resident at a long-term care home while the other five involve community transmission, according to the numbers released by the health unit. 

Sunday marks the third instance since March where no new cases of the virus have been reported in the area.

The region's death toll remains unchanged at 56 and 36 of those deaths are linked to residents and staff members from seniors' homes across Middlesex and London. 

Over the course of the pandemic, 555 people in the region have contracted the virus, but 413 of those cases have been resolved. 

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