Kitchener-Waterloo

Graphic shows how 1 case of COVID-19 can spread within days

Region of Waterloo Public Health released an infographic on Friday showing how one person with COVID-19 attending a party can spread to homes, schools and workplaces.

'Our actions matter,' public health says in social media post

Region of Waterloo Public Health released this infographic to show how a single case of COVID-19 can spread to other people within days. (Region of Waterloo Public Health)

Region of Waterloo Public Health officials have released a new infographic explaining how one person with COVID-19 attending a party can spread the virus to homes, schools and workplaces in a matter of days.

"Our actions matter," public health said on Twitter. "An individual with symptoms attended a large social gathering. Within a week, in Waterloo region, 15 more confirmed cases and 33 high-risk contacts were identified."

The infographic was released the same day Waterloo region reported 42 new cases of COVID-19. In just November, there have been 141 new cases of the virus. The region was also placed in the "yellow/protect" category of the province's COVID-19 framework, meaning there is targeted enforcement, fines and enhanced education to limit further spread of the virus.

Dr. Hsiu-Li Wang, the region's acting medical officer of health, says many cases are being spread by close contact - situations where people feel familiar with individuals outside their households so they may be getting closer than two meters for prolonged periods of time and they may not wear a mask.

Public health officials say people need to stay home if they experience any symptoms, including if they're mild. For people who live with others, it's also important to self-isolate within the home when possible.

"We all have a role to play," public health tweeted. 

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