Kitchener-Waterloo

Construction worker strike slows projects in Waterloo region, Guelph

A labour strike involving more than 15,000 construction workers in Ontario is impacting high rise projects in Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph. 

Union says strike impacts high rise construction in Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph 

More than 15,000 construction workers across Ontario are on strike. (CBC)

A labour strike involving more than 15,000 construction workers in Ontario is impacting high rise projects in Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph. 

The workers, who are members of Labourers' International Union of North America (LiUNA) Local 183, walked off the job on Sunday. They include people who do structural work on apartment buildings, self-levelling flooring workers, house framers and tile, railing, carpet and hardwood installers.

The union wants to see wage packages that reflect work done during the pandemic, address inflation and expected increases.

"Fundamentally, it is about money," Jason Ottey, director of government relations and communications for LiUNA Local 183, told CBC News on Monday. 

He confirmed that the strike impacts high rise construction workers in Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph.

Workers with the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) Local 793, which represents crane and heavy equipment operators, are also striking. The union has offices in several Ontario cities including Cambridge.

According to the Residential Construction Council of Ontario (RESCON), a large number of collective agreements have been settled, have gone to arbitration, or have reached a tentative agreement and await a ratification vote.

"We are encouraged that a number of collective agreements have been settled. However, there is no reason for work stoppages, and we hope that the arbitrated settlement will encourage other parties to return to the bargaining table and reach an agreement," said RESCON president Richard Lyall in a news release.

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