Kitchener-Waterloo

Turn up the heat and crank the tunes: Tips from CBC K-W to get through record cold

Crank those tunes, pretend you're by the pool and chow down on summery foods to beat the ongoing cold snap in Waterloo Region.
If you can't make it to a beach like this, beat the cold with these tips from CBC K-W. (Iakov Kalinin/Shutterstock)

It's record-breaking cold in Waterloo Region this week and the frigid weather is going stay that way for weeks to come, according to Environment Canada. Here at CBC K-W, we wanted some ways to feel warm to make it through the next few cold weeks, ways that don't involve hopping on a plane and moving to Florida forever. 

    Here are our suggestions for staying warm in Waterloo Region and beyond. How are you beating the cold? Let us know by sending your us your tips and suggestions and we could play them on the air or feature them on our website.

    Amanda Grant: go to the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington

    Amanda says: For a taste of the tropics with a fraction of the price tag try going to the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington. Or for a closer option head to a local nursery that stays open in the winter, like Belgian Nursery on Highway 7 in Kitchener. The cactus festival is on at Belgian's until February 24, with lots of species (and warm temperatures) making winter feel miles away." 

    (JL Jahn/Shutterstock)

    Andrea Bellemare: watch a surf movie while eating spicy tacos

    Andrea says: "Check out this absolutely beautiful short film, a sonnet to surfing, by photographer/filmmaker Morgan Maassen.

    Watch it while eating your favourite taco recipe with extra peppers."

    On mobile? Click here to see the video.

    ​Colin Butler: make it feel like summer in 3 steps

    Colin says:

    1. Make a paloma (the margarita's underrated cousin): 
    Grapefuit juice, lime, sugar, tequila and club soda in a salt-rimmed glass. 

    2. Drink. 

    3. Repeat, until you feel "summery." 

    (vsl/Shutterstock)

    Craig Norris: go to the Cambridge butterfly conservatory.

    Craig says: 'The Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory is an escape, but they won't let you live there.'

    The Butterfly Conservatory is open daily, and you can check out insects, butterflies, plants and pretend you're in the jungle.

    A rice paper butterfly. (Leena Robinson/Shutterstock)

    Jackie Sharkey: pretend you're poolside

    Jackie says: "The other weekend, we stepped back into summer at my house as we cranked up the heat, turned on the humidifier, wore shorts and sundresses, turned OFF the TV and turned on a summertime Songza playlist while we barbecued steak and veggies, and sipped margaritas."

    (Lorna Roberts/Shutterstock)

    Jane van Koeverden: visit your local library

    Jane says: "The Kitchener Public Library in downtown re-opened almost a year ago, and it runs programs and events, like writing workshops and lectures, for all ages on a daily basis. You can also experiment with its Digital Media Lab, which is equipped with a 3-D printer, as well as music production and photo editing software. At the end of the day, borrow a stack of books, movies or video games and hole up at home."

    (Andrea Bellemare/CBC)

    Matt Kang: put on the summer jams

    Matt says: Listen to music that you would normally listen to when there's more heat and sun.

    On mobile? Click here to view the video.

    Melanie Ferrier: walk quickly and wear as much wool as possible.

    Melanie says: "Hand and foot warmers are awesome. The only reason I haven't lost any digits to frost bite."

    (Karen Grigoryan/Shutterstock)

    Pras Rajagopalan: Be thankful you don't live out East

    Pras says: "I'm staying warm by counting my lucky stars I'm not in the Maritime provinces, which have been hit really hard this weekend." 

    An abandoned car is buried in snow in downtown Charlottetown on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

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