Kitchener-Waterloo

Parts shortages at some Ontario auto plants causing shutdowns

Toyota Canada paused production at its Cambridge and Woodstock plants in Ontario due to “issues” at one of its parts suppliers, a company spokesperson confirmed to CBC News.

Toyota Canada temporarily halted production at 3 plants his week

Line workers assemble a Lexus SUV at the Toyota plant in Cambridge, Ont., in this file photo. Toyota Canada paused production at its Cambridge and Woodstock plants Thursday due to a parts-supply issue, a company spokesperson confirmed to CBC News. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press)

Toyota Canada paused production at its Cambridge and Woodstock plants in Ontario on Thursday due to "issues" at one of its parts suppliers, a company spokesperson confirmed to CBC News.

Michael Bouliane said some non-production work is continuing. He did not say when the plants are expected to fully reopen.

"We are monitoring the situation closely and will advise our production employees once the parts supply issue has been resolved," he said in an email.

Bouliane didn't provide further details about what the issues were or which supplier was affected.

On Wednesday, the Toyotetsu auto-parts plant in Simcoe announced a temporary closure affecting 1,200 employees after eight staff tested positive for COVID-19 in recent weeks.

It isn't clear whether this is the supplier that led to the shutdown at Toyota Canada's three plants. However, the Toyotetsu website notes Toyota Canada is the Simcoe plant's "main customer."

Toyota Canada employs 8,500 people at its three Ontario plants. 

General Motors, Chrysler also facing shutdowns

Toyota Canada isn't the only Ontario auto manufacturer dealing with supply chain problems.

The General Motors CAMI plant in Ingersoll has been shut down since early February due to a global shortage of semi-conductors, said spokesperson Jennifer Wright in an email. The company told employees Friday the shutdown will last until at least the week of June 28.

The Chrysler Windsor assembly plant will also be down the first week of May due to a global microchip shortage, according to a statement from LouAnn Goseelin with Stellantis N.V., which owns the Chrysler brand.

CBC Kitchener-Waterloo asked the Ford Motor Company if it is experiencing shutdowns, but did not receive a response by publication time. 

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