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Moms may perpetuate gender stereotypes more than dads, Guelph research shows

A new study from the University of Guelph has found mothers may push gender stereotypes around emotions like anger and sadness more than fathers, though they may not be doing so intentionally.
A new study from the University of Guelph looks at how parents perpetuate gender stereotypes around emotion, like anger and sadness, in their children. (CBC)

Boys shouldn't cry and girls shouldn't get angry.

Those may seem like outdated gender stereotypes, but a new study from the University of Guelph says when it comes to those big feelings, parents today continue to perpetuate those stereotypes. 

The study also found mothers tend to push gender stereotypes more than fathers, but may not realize they're doing it.

Listen to the interview with Kristel Thomassin, a psychology professor at University of Guelph and lead author of the study.

A new study from the University of Guelph says moms tend to push gender stereotypes more than fathers on children, although they may not realize it. Kristel Thomassin is a psychology professor at the university and lead author of the study. 5:04

 

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