Kitchener-Waterloo

Fatal crash with train a reminder to be safe at rural rail crossings: OPP

Police are reminding motorists to slow down and be aware of their surroundings at rural rail crossings after a train-car collision in Innerkip over the long weekend killed two men from Kitchener.

'The damage that can be done from a freight train is incredible,' OPP Const. Rod LeClair says

Police are reminding drivers to stop and look both ways before crossing rural rail crossings where there are no lights to indicate if a train is coming. That comes after two men from Kitchener died on Sunday following a collision between a car and a train in Innerkip. (OPP West/ Twitter)

The fatal collision between a car and a train in Innerkip on the long weekend is a reminder to all drivers to be on the lookout at they approach rural rail crossings, an officer with the Ontario Provincial Police says.

Two men from Kitchener died in the collision Sunday at 3 p.m.: Cole Bey, 27, and Raymond Friolet, 26.

Bey, the driver, was pronounced dead at the scene. Friolet, who was a passenger in the vehicle, was taken to hospital and later died of his injuries. There was no one else in the vehicle at the time.

It's unclear the cause of the collision, which occurred at a rail crossing on George Street in Innerkip, a small town located northeast of Woodstock.

The westbound train hit the car's driver's side, pushing it down the tracks. There are red and white railway crossing signs at the location and yellow, diamond-shaped signs that tell drivers to "stop before crossing."

There are no lights or arms to prevent a vehicle from crossing the tracks when a train is approaching. There is a curve in the tracks west of the crossing.

Damage can be 'incredible'

The fatal collision is a reminder for people to be safe on the roads, says OPP Const. Rod LeClair.

"The damage that can be done from a freight train is incredible," he said in an interview.

He offered tips to drivers to be safe, including:

  • To be aware of your surroundings on rural roads. 
  • Keep the radio at "a reasonable level" so you can hear trains or other vehicles. 
  • Use extra caution when approaching train tracks where there are only signs.

"If there's no flashing lights or barrier arms, people should always stop and look both ways," LeClair said.

An investigation into the crash is ongoing.  The OPP are asking anyone with information about Sunday's collision to contact them or Crime Stoppers.

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