Kitchener-Waterloo

House of Friendship receives $100K to support addictions and substance use treatment services

The House of Friendship will receive $100,000 to support its addictions and substance use treatment services, it was announced Thursday.

‘This extra funding will support an additional 100 people,’ director of addiction services says

Each year House of Friendship offers hope and help to individuals and families across Waterloo Region who are impacted by poverty or addiction. (Submitted by Tara Groves-Taylor)

The House of Friendship will receive $100,000 to support its addictions and substance use treatment services, it was announced Thursday.

Kitchener-Conestoga MPP Mike Harris and Kitchener South-Hespeler MPP Amy Fee made the announcement, which comes after the Ontario government said it would provide an additional $176 million this year to help expand access for critical mental health and addictions supports during COVID-19. 

Tara Groves-Taylor, director of addiction services at House of Friendship, says the extra funding "will support an additional 100 people who have addiction concerns, providing evidence-based interventions that allow these individuals to return to their families and employment, and enjoy a better quality of life."

Fee says each year House of Friendship offers hope and help to individuals and families across Waterloo region who are impacted by poverty or addiction by "working with those who need food, housing, substance use treatment, or support in low-income neighbourhoods."

The investment will help in several priority areas, including: 

  • Community-based services in English and French, including services for children and youth.
  • Mental health and justice services.
  • Supportive housing for individuals with serious mental health and addiction challenges, and who are either homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.
  • Community and residential addictions, including treatment and care for opioid addictions.
  • Increased supports for Indigenous peoples, families, and communities.
  • More hospital in-patient beds for mental health and addiction patients.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now