Kitchener-Waterloo

Four community leaders from Kitchener-Waterloo named to Order of Canada

Stephanie and Joe Mancini of Kitchener have been named members of the Order of Canada by the Governor General, along with University of Waterloo history professor James Walker. Plattsville-born John Richard English was promoted within the Order to an officer.

Two University of Waterloo professors also recognized

The Order of Canada medals are displayed during an investiture ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa in 2015. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

A Kitchener couple who have dedicated their lives to helping the poor in Kitchener-Waterloo are among four local people who have been invested into the Order of Canada by Governor General David Johnston.

Stephanie and Joe Mancini of Kitchener were named members of the Order of Canada for their work in helping "the homeless and marginalized of the Kitchener-Waterloo region, notably for the creation of The Working Centre."

The Working Centre is a nonprofit organization that has a job search resource centre, St. John's Kitchen, community tools, access to technology, affordable supportive housing and the Waterloo School for Community Development.

Professors recognized

James Walker was named a member of the Order of Canada. He is a history professor at the University of Waterloo and specializes in human rights and race relations. He has written several books and articles about historical campaigns that have reformed human rights.

He was recognized for "his influential scholarship that has shed light on the contributions of Black Canadians to the development of our nation."

Plattsville-born John Richard English was promoted within the Order to an officer. His career has included being an author, professor and politician. He was worked at the University of Waterloo and was honoured for his "contributions as a historian, author and administrator who has expanded our knowledge and understanding of Canada's rich political heritage."

The Order of Canada was started in 1967 and is one of the country's highest civilian honours. Since 1967, more than 6,500 people have been invested into the Order.

The new appointees will be invited to accept their insignia at a ceremony later this year with Johnston.

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