Kitchener-Waterloo

Former Kitchener neurologist stripped of license after patients sexually assaulted

A former Kitchener neurologist has agreed never to practise medicine again after the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario found he had sexually assaulted four patients between 2010 and 2017.

Warning: This story contains graphic details

A former Kitchener neurologist has agreed never to practise medicine again after the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario found he had sexually assaulted four patients between 2010 and 2017. (sasirin pamai/Shutterstock)

A former Kitchener neurologist will no longer be able to practice medicine after being found to have sexually assaulted at least four patients between 2010 and 2017.

Jeffrey Scott Sloka, 50, did not dispute a statement of facts and pleaded no contest to having his certificate of registration revoked by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO).

He must also pay $64,240 to support therapy costs for the victims, $6,000 to the college for the costs of the hearing and he has signed an undertaking agreeing to never apply or reapply to practise medicine in Ontario or any other jurisdiction.

A woman read a statement from her teenager daughter who was identified as Patient A in the hearing documents. The daughter said she's lost trust in healthcare providers.

Jeffrey Scott Sloka has signed an undertaking agreeing to never apply or reapply to practise medicine in Ontario or any other jurisdiction after he did not dispute allegations of sexual assault made by four patients to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. (Grand River Hospital Annual Report)
"I am no longer able to trust any male physicians. I feel robbed of the opportunity to work with male health practitioners," she said.

"My personal relationships and daily life have also been impacted. I feel robbed of the simple joy of an intimate relationship, which everyone should be able to enjoy."

In her submission to the discipline committee, the college's prosecutor Dr. Morgana Kellythorne said patients are "at their most vulnerable" when they're being examined.

"These patients were exploited and deceived by Dr. Sloka for his own sexual purposes," she said. "They turned to him seeking help for their medical needs and he preyed on them."

The college says Sloka has waived his right to an appeal.

Sloka's primary practice was at Grand River Hospital in Kitchener. He was put under restrictions in September 2017 as a result of the accusations.

Grand River Hospital communications officer Jennifer Condick said they cannot comment on the case due to privacy reasons.

"Grand River Hospital takes great pride in our exceptional care providers and we trust any decisions made through the CPSO are done in the best interest of our community," Condick said.

Waterloo Regional Police Services says they are also investigating the allegations.

Patients describe experiences

The statement of uncontested facts lists the experiences of four patients, identified as Patient A through D.

Patient A was referred to Sloka in August 2010 for an assessment on seizures.

As part of that assessment, Sloka said he would need to perform a physical assessment to look for "anything like moles" and needed her to undress completely. He asked her to remove her gown during a visual examination and also when testing her reflexes.

The patient told the college this made her uncomfortable.

The college notes in the documents that while skin lesions are a marker of syndromes causing epilepsy, patients would still be covered during a skin examination.

The experiences of Patients B and C involved Sloka cupping or touching their breasts, and Patient C later told her family she had been "felt up."

Patient D was a patient between 2011 and 2018 and was first referred as a university student after having a seizure. Her experience involved Sloka touching her genitals and rectum with an ungloved hand on at least three appointments.

This, the college said, "was touching of a sexual nature and not of a clinical nature."

In all four instances, the college found Sloka "engaged in disgraceful, dishonourable and unprofessional conduct towards and sexual abuse" of the patients.

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