Kitchener-Waterloo

Kitchener holds marathon session on fate of dangerous dog

Members of Kitchener's dog designation appeal committee spent nearly 6 hours yesterday deciding the fate of 'Pasha', a dog deemed dangerous by the city.

The results of the appeal will not be known until mid-September

The Dog Designation Appeal Committee is composed of city staff, a councillor, and two members of the community

Members of Kitchener's dog designation appeal committee spent nearly 6 hours Monday deciding the fate of 'Pasha', a dog deemed dangerous by the city.

Dogs deemed dangerous can be faced with a series of restrictions including muzzling, confinement to a home or cage, and the inability to roam free when children are present. Owners who do not follow the imposed restrictions can face a maximum fine of $25,000.

Euthanasia of the dog is not included in the possible restrictions.

The results of the session, originally scheduled for two hours, will not be available publicly until mid-September, according to Kitchener officials. 

After hearing evidence from a variety of witnesses, the committee will decide whether to remove the designation, keep it, or keep it with modified restrictions. 

Before a dog is deemed dangerous, the Kitchener Waterloo Human Society conducts an investigation. 

"A dangerous dog designation comes about when there has been either a dog on dog attack or a dog on person attack," said Kathrin Delutis, the humane society's executive director. 

"Typically its a victim, or the owner of a victim dog that reports it to us."

Of the four appeals the committee has heard since 2018, one dog was deemed dangerous for attacking a human without provocation, and another two for attacking other dogs.

The fourth was a prohibited dog. Pit bulls, and breeds like them, are prohibited. 

These attacks aren't standard instances of dogs playing, according to Delutis. "Somebody will report an attack because there's been an injury."

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