Kitchener-Waterloo

Doctor 'cautioned' after boy receives wrong vaccine twice at Cambridge clinic

A family doctor has been cautioned by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario after a boy was given the wrong vaccine twice at a walk-in clinic in Cambridge, Ont.

Boy received wrong meningitis vaccine twice, from two different doctors at same walk-in clinic

A boy in Cambridge was given the wrong meningitis vaccine by two different doctors at First Line Walk-In Clinic, according to a decision from the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board. (onair/Shutterstock )

A family doctor has been cautioned by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario after a boy was given the wrong vaccine twice at a walk-in clinic in Cambridge, Ont.

According to a decision by the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board, the boy and his mother attended First Line Walk-In Clinic on Dec. 15, 2017 to receive a vaccine for meningitis.

The doctor who saw the boy administered the Menjucate C vaccine instead of the Men C ACYW135 vaccine.

The boy and his mother later returned to the clinic on Jan. 20, 2018, to receive the correct vaccine and were seen by a different doctor.

The second doctor, referred to by the appeal board as S.T., yet again administered the wrong vaccine.

S.T. is described by the appeal board as a family practitioner based in Windsor, who occasionally works weekends at the Cambridge clinic.

Physician did not review medical records

According to the appeal board, S.T. told the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario's complaints committee that she was unable to review the boy's medical chart before administering the vaccine because her computer had frozen.

It was only after the vaccine was already administered, that the computer unfroze and S.T. learned of her error, as well the previous doctor's mistake.

The appeal board noted the committee was "very concerned" that S.T. provided medical treatment without access to the patient's medical records and decided that the doctor should be "cautioned in person."

A caution in person is issued when the committee believes a doctor "would benefit from direction provided in person about the issues raised" regarding their practice, professionalism or conduct.

The committee also requested that S.T. write a two to four page report on vaccines for infants and children "and how she will avoid similar errors going forward."

The committee's decision was upheld by the appeal board last month.

CBC News has been unable to confirm the outcome of the complaint against the first doctor who also administered the wrong vaccine.

A copy of the committee's decision in that case has been requested from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario.

CBC News has also reached out to First Line Walk-In Clinic for comment, but has not received a response.

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