Kitchener-Waterloo

Canada election 2015: Meet your Kitchener Centre candidates

In the run-up to the election on October 19, CBC Kitchener-Waterloo will be hosting the candidates in all of Waterloo Region's five ridings for panel discussions on issues affecting the community.

Conservative, Liberal and NDP candidates participate in live panel

In the run-up to the election on October 19, CBC Kitchener-Waterloo will be hosting the candidates in all of Waterloo Region's five ridings for panel discussions on issues close affecting the community. 

This week we heard from the Conservative, NDP and Liberal candidates in Kitchener Centre in our panel discussion on CBC Radio'sThe Morning Edition with host Craig Norris. Green Party candidate Nicholas Wendler declined to participate in the panel. 


Stephen Woodworth - Conservative

"The economy is my party's number one priority," said Stephen Woodworth.

Woodworth used the Conservative government's current $5 billion surplus and ongoing tax cuts to illustrate how the economy remains top of mind for the party.

He also cited the latest election announcement from the Conservatives, a $100 million investment in manufacturing. 

"I've lived in Kitchener all my life and I care about the many people I've worked with, lived with and met over the years and I'll need your help on election day," Woodworth said.


Susan Cadell - NDP

"One major aspect of our platform is to work cooperatively with provinces and municipalities on such issues as housing, health care and infrastructure," said Susan Cadell.

Cadell, a professor of social work at the University of Waterloo, said she was personally interested in getting involved in the discussion on doctor-assisted suicide in the House of Commons.

"The NDP believes that this is an opportunity to have a nation-wide strategy on palliative care," Cadell said. 


Raj Saini - Liberal

As a pharmacist, Saini said he sees the challenges Canadians face first hand.

"I'm dealing with young people who cannot find employment, I'm dealing with seniors who are having difficulty making ends meet, I'm dealing with middle-aged Canadians who have been downsized or have lost their jobs," Saini said. 

If elected, Saini said he would address these issues, citing the Liberals plans to invest in infrastructure and communities. 

"Our party is the only party making historic investments in Canada and in Canadians." 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now