Kitchener-Waterloo

Here are the top 10 collision hot spots for pedestrians and cyclists in Waterloo region

A report going to the region's planning and works committee Tuesday shows the region's top 10 collision hot spots for pedestrians and cyclists in 2018.

Kitchener had most collision hotspot areas for pedestrians, while Cambridge had most for cyclists

A cyclist rides on King Street in uptown Waterloo. A new report to regional councillors shows the areas of the region where pedestrians or cyclists are more likely to be hit by a vehicle. (Joe Pavia/CBC)

Kitchener and Cambridge have the highest number of collision areas for pedestrians and cyclists, according to a report going to the region's planning and works committee Tuesday.

The report looks at data from collisions that were reported from 2014 to 2018.

Overall, the number of total collisions reported in 2018 were slightly higher from 2017, going from 6,263 reported collisions to 6,370. There were six deaths in 2018, compared to nine in 2017.

But the total numbers of cyclist collisions went down. In 2018, 79 cyclist collisions were reported, down from 101 in 2017. 

Pedestrian collisions were also down in 2018 from 139 reported in 2017 to 110 in 2018.

"Staff continue to conduct research to determine suitable countermeasures to reduce pedestrian collisions," the staff report says.

Top ranked areas for pedestrian collision

The report ranked the areas of the region that have seen the highest number of collisions for pedestrians in 2018. They are:

  1. University Avenue at Albert Street in Waterloo.
  2. Ainslie Street at Main Street in Cambridge.
  3. King Street at Bishop Street in Cambridge.
  4. Erb Street at Ira Needles Boulevard in Waterloo.
  5. Kingsway Drive at Wilson Avenue in Kitchener.
  6. University Avenue at Philip Street in Waterloo.
  7. Fairway Road at Fairview Park Mall in Kitchener.
  8. Westmount Road at Victoria Street in Kitchener.
  9. River Road at Holborn Drive in Kitchener.
  10. Hespeler Road at Dunbar Road in Cambridge.

While not listed, the area of University Avenue and Lester Street in Waterloo was flagged by students as an intersection in need of traffic lights to ensure students and pedestrians could cross safely.

The region added a set of traffic lights along University Avenue to improve pedestrian safety in November.

The top three collision areas in 2017 were:

  1. Westmount Road at Victoria Street in Kitchener.
  2. King Street at Bishop Street in Cambridge.
  3. University Avenue at Albert Street in Waterloo.

In 2016, the top three collision areas for pedestrians were:

  1. King Street at University Avenue in Waterloo.
  2. King Street at Bishop Street in Cambridge.
  3. River Road at Holborn Drive in Kitchener.

Top ranked areas for cyclist collision

The report also ranked the areas of the region that have seen the highest number of collisions with cyclists in 2018. They are:

  1. Hespeler Road at Munch Avenue in Cambridge.
  2. Hespeler Road at Bishop Street in Cambridge.
  3. Courtland Avenue at Siebert Avenue in Kitchener.
  4. Hespeler Road at Avenue Road in Cambridge.
  5. Water Street N. between Ainslie Street and Simcoe Street in Cambridge.
  6. Weber Street E. between Fergus Avenue and Kinzie Avenue in Kitchener.
  7. Highland Road W. between Butler Lane and Westmount Road in Kitchener.
  8. University Avenue between Regina Street and Weber Street in Waterloo.
  9. Hespeler Road at Can-Amera Parkway in Cambridge.
  10. Dundas Street at Elgin Street in Cambridge.

In 2017, the top three collision areas for cyclists were:

  1. Westmount Road at Victoria Street in Kitchener.
  2. King Street at Bishop Street in Cambridge.
  3. University Avenue at Albert Street in Waterloo.

While in 2016, the top three collision areas were:

  1. Cedar Street at King Street in Kitchener.
  2. Hespeler Road at Munch Avenue in Cambridge.
  3. Courtland Avenue at Siebert Avenue in Kitchener.

In August, the region approved a five-kilometre separated bike lane pilot project along University Avenue, Columbia Street, King Street, Albert Street and Erb Street.

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