Kamloops

The pros and cons of doctor-assisted dying from a range of opinion in Kamloops

The bill is restricted to adults facing 'foreseeable' death, strict limits include 18-year age requirement

The bill is restricted to adults facing 'foreseeable' death, strict limits include 18-year age requirement

Steve Rollheiser, a physician at Royal Inland hospital and Jessica Vliegenthart is a personal injury lawyer in Kamloops (CBC/Daybreak Kamloops)

It's not exactly dinner table conversation, but the Federal Government's Doctor Assisted Dying bill is weighing heavily on a lot of people's minds.

Doctors and nurses, hospice workers, hospital administrators, theologists and people who are struggling with serious illness or dementia.

Many admit to feeling troubled about what this legislation would look like and how it might impact their lives and work.

To get the conversation rolling, Daybreak reached out to a number of people in Kamloops.

All have something to say about doctor-assisted death.

Daybreak began, in studio, with Dr. Steve Rollheiser, a physician at Royal Inland hospital and Jessica Vliegenthart is a personal injury lawyer in Kamloops.

To listen to the entire panel interview, click on the link: The pros and cons of doctor-assisted dying from a range of opinion in Kamloops.

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