Hamilton

Norfolk OPP urge residents not to call them about barking dogs

Noisy dogs are just the latest in a string of situations and occurrences the OPP has asked people not to call about. Recent months have seen police report receiving calls about kids not wanting to do the dishes, homeowners complaining about raccoons someone dialling 911 because they couldn't decide what to watch on TV.

Police say there's an online form people can use instead

Provincial police say there's an online form that will allow people to file complaints about loud dogs from the comfort of their own home. (CBC)

Norfolk County OPP is begging residents to stop calling police about barking dogs.

Provincial police say they respond to numerous complaints about loud dogs every year, despite the fact the county actually has an online "evidence package" that can be "completed from the comforts of their own home."

The online form lays out the proper way to report noisy pets to the county's by-law enforcement for further investigation.

It includes several tips including that noise must be documented for a minimum of five days and that the person reporting must be able to actually see the dog barking.

"I am urging all residents to utilize the Barking Dog Evidence Package that is available on-line to everyone in Norfolk County," wrote Insp. Joseph Varga in a media release. "This is an easy and effective way to make and official complaint regarding a barking dog in your community."

Barking dogs are just the latest in a long string of situations and occurrences police in Norfolk County have asked people not to call about. Recent months have seen police report receiving emergency calls about kids not wanting to do the dishes, homeowners complaining about raccoons someone dialling 911 because they couldn't decide what to watch on TV.

Police have responded to the calls by issuing reminders that 911 is meant for emergencies only and that tying the line up with could have tragic consequences.

"All of these calls are taking dispatchers away from people who legitimately need assistance or are in an emergency situation," Const. Ed Sanchuk previously told CBC. "The concern we have now is we're taking emergency services away from people who actually need them. You're wasting taxpayer dollars and technically putting lives in jeopardy."