Tweet the next verse of the #macpoem

The writer in residence for McMaster and Hamilton Public Library is inviting members of the Mac community to contribute to poem tweet by tweet, by using the hashtag #macpoem.

Social media literary experiment asks McMaster community to write a giant poem tweet by tweet

McMaster University and Hamilton Public Library's writer in residence, Hal Niedzviecki, invites you to contribute to the community #macpoem via Twitter.

You don't have to be an aspiring writer to pen the next line of Hal Niedzviecki's giant poem, you just need to have a twitter account.

The writer in residence for McMaster and Hamilton Public Library is inviting members of the Mac community to contribute to A Cause or Reason by the Teriyaki Express or The Strange Case of the Missing Phone tweet by tweet,  by using the hashtag #macpoem.

The poem starts off with a student named Chase who writes a a philosophy paper entirely on her cell phone while riding the Go Bus to class at McMaster. On the morning the paper is due, she heads to school to print the assignment and discovers her cell phone has gone missing.

"It goes from there. We're throwing it out to the community at large saying what is she going to do and what happens next," says Niedzviecki.

The social media poetry experiment began on Tuesday and will last seven days until Tues. Feb. 10.

It's a way to reach out to people and get them involved in creating literature-Hal Niedzviecki 

Hopefully we will see it build and evolve and take some strange turns," he said.

At the end of the week, the full poem will be converted into a graphic and read at an event on March 25 featuring local hamilton aspiring writers.

Niedzviecki says he came up with the idea as a way to get students and staff at McMaster interested in writing even if they don't consider to be one themselves.

"It's a way to reach out to people and get them involved in creating literature," says Hiedzviecki, whose job as writer in residence involves helping and mentoring local aspiring writers. 

He says the poem has been around for thousands of years and is a way for people to add to literary culture by letting us look deeper into the world around us. 

"For someone to sit down and write a couple of lines of the poem with 140 characters or less, using the constraints of twitter just seems like a natural thing."

While the #macpoem is technically for the McMaster community, Niedzviecki is fine with outsiders dropping in and adding a line or two.

Anyone in the Hamilton or McMaster communities working on a creative writing project and seeking feedback on their work can request a meeting with Niedzviecki by contacting the Hamilton Public Library.

Below is Niedzviecki's first line and examples of two later contributions from others.