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$20K in Lego stolen from Hamilton Toys R Us

Lego's popularity has surged in recent years, making the property a hot target for thieves, too.

Thefts illustrate burgeoning black market in iconic building toy

Lego's popularity has surged in recent years, making the property a hot target for thieves, too. (Bunpa-Henri Tan/Twitter)

Hamilton police are still piecing together clues after three thieves ran off with $20,000 in Lego from a Toys R Us in Stoney Creek last month.

It happened on Oct. 25 at the Toys R Us at 540 Centennial Parkway N., police say, when three people forced their way inside the store through a door before the location was open.

Once inside, they grabbed a "large quantity" of Lego products from the shelves before taking off. The retail value of the stolen building block toys is over $20,000, police say.

Long a staple in toy chests the world over, Lego's popularity (and price point) has surged in recent years.

The massively popular Lego Movie – which had a worldwide domestic gross of over $468 million – has helped bolster sales, alongside licensed play sets based on popular franchises like The Avengers and Star Wars.

Prices have ballooned too, especially for intricate sets. A Lego Star Wars Death Star set will run you $599 before tax.

Prices like that on top of huge demand make the toys lucrative in their original packaging for the resale market. All of the Legos stolen from the Hamilton location were still sealed and in their original packaging, police say.

Earlier this year, San Diego police busted a major toy theft ring, which included $100,000 in stolen goods, including Legos, ABC News reported.

Four people were also charged in Phoenix, Arizona earlier this year when police discovered $244,000 in stolen Legos.

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