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Burlington recording engineer wins big at Grammys with Bruno Mars

Burlington sound engineer Charles Moniz won three awards at the 2018 Grammy Awards for his part in Bruno Mars’s latest multi-platinum album, 24K Magic.

Charles Moniz won in several categories for his work on Mars's '24K Magic'

Charles Moniz (bottom right) is seen here in studio with Bruno Mars (centre). Moniz is up for multiple Grammy Awards this year for his work on "24K Magic." (Charlez Moniz)

Charles Moniz has the voice of someone who did some celebrating last night.

As well he should — the Burlington, Ont. sound engineer won three Grammy awards Sunday for his work with Bruno Mars on 24K Magic. Moniz took home awards for best engineered album in a non-classical category, record of the year and album of the year.

"It's such an awesome, crazy feeling. I probably won't ever get used to talking about it, ever," Moniz said, hoarsely.

I was so psyched that the library gave me a shout out.- Charles Moniz

He may have to get used it. Moniz had already won a Grammy for record of the year in 2016 for Mark Ronson's Uptown Funk featuring Mars. He was instrumental in constructing that "doh" vocal bassline that kicks off the track.

Then in 2017, he won another Grammy, this time for his work on Adele's 25.

As a recording engineer, Moniz is responsible for everything from the mics in the studio to the mixing console to the sound that's pumping out of the studio speakers.

Since the news broke last night, Moniz's phone has been lighting up constantly with well wishes from friends and family. Though he's part of an international touring act, some of the best messages have come from home, he says — like when the Burlington Public Library reached out to congratulate him.

"I was so psyched that the library gave me a shout out," he said with a laugh.

Moniz wasn't actually able to accept the award for best engineered album in person — as it was handed out before the telecast itself, and he was busy preparing for Mars's performance at the awards show later that evening.

Instead, he was sitting outside a broadcast truck, tweaking mixes for the show.

That's the nature of the entertainment business, he says — you get the glitz of a red carpet, but also intense, hard work for people working behind the scenes on a performance.

"That's the dance, you know?" he said.

adam.carter@cbc.ca

About the Author

Adam Carter

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Adam Carter is a Newfoundlander who now calls Toronto home. He enjoys a good story and playing loud music in dank bars. You can follow him on Twitter @AdamCarterCBC or drop him an email at adam.carter@cbc.ca.