Hamilton

Posters linking alt-right to neo-Nazis removed at McMaster

Days after flyers promoting an extreme alt-right website appeared at McMaster University and were subsequently torn down, the university has also removed posters equating the alt-right with neo-Nazism.
These flyers were found on campus at McMaster University yesterday. They were subsequently taken down by staff. (David Vandenberg)

Days after flyers promoting an extreme alt-right website appeared at McMaster University and were subsequently torn down, the university has also removed posters equating the alt-right with neo-Nazism.

The posters, which university spokesperson Gord Arbeau says appeared in the student centre Monday morning, proclaim "alt-right = neo-Nazi" and "No Nazis on our campus!" in bold letters.

The flyers, which were posted after another set of flyers decrying "anti-white propaganda" were found on campus late last week, say that the alt-right hides its racist views under the guise of "protecting European/white culture" and "free speech."

"Any attempt to legitimize right-wing racist and fascist views in politics and society will not be 'debated,'" the second round of posters reads. "They must be given zero tolerance and fought."

These counter posters are just the latest local example of conflicts arising across North America over what is considered acceptable speech and discourse in the wake of Donald Trump's U.S. election win and his support for what have been called alt-right politics.

Arbeau told CBC News that the second set of posters were removed by university staff — as were the first — because they "do not reflect a welcoming and inclusive community and the posting did not follow the University's poster distribution procedure."

"McMaster's goal is to ensure a welcoming and inclusive community," he said. "It is the responsibility of all those who come to the campus each day to engage in civil and respectful conversations and dialogue."

The original posters that were plastered around McMaster and in Westdale a few days ago linked to an extreme alt-right blog, which is full of racist overtones, and equates racial pride with patriotism.

The alt-right movement came sharply to the fore during the U.S. presidential election. President-elect Donald Trump has drawn criticism for naming Steve Bannon, former head of a website linked to the alt-right, as his chief White House strategist.

The National Policy Institute, a think-tank that is part of the alt-right movement, held a gathering in Washington, D.C. at the federally owned Ronald Reagan Building on Saturday.

A video by the Atlantic that was taken inside the conference showed Richard Spencer, leader of the National Policy Institute, shouting to a crowd of about 200 people: "Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!" as some attendees lifted their hands in a Nazi salute.

Trump condemned the National Policy Institute in an interview with New York Times editors on Tuesday. 

adam.carter@cbc.ca

About the Author

Adam Carter

Reporter

Adam Carter is a Newfoundlander who now calls Toronto home. He enjoys a good story and playing loud music in dank bars. You can follow him on Twitter @AdamCarterCBC or drop him an email at adam.carter@cbc.ca.

With files from the Associated Press