Headlines

Hamilton will designate hills for tobogganing

The city of Hamilton will designate a handful of hills for safe tobogganing after community outcry against its bylaw banning the winter activity.

Activity has been banned since a Hamilton lawyer sued the city

The city will designate a handful of hills as tobogganing friendly after a 10-year ban on the practice. (Laura Cole/Youtube)

The city of Hamilton will designate a handful of hills for safe tobogganing after community outcry against its bylaw banning the winter activity.

City staff will designate hills that are safer for the practice, which will cost about $12,000 per year to maintain. Councillors will also give their input on the most popular tobogganing areas in their wards.

I think this strikes a pretty good balance.- Coun. Terry Whitehead

The bylaw, meanwhile, will stay on the books. But as in previous years, it will not be actively enforced. And the bylaw already says that tobogganing is allowed on sanctioned hills.

Coun. Terry Whitehead of Ward 8, one of the most vocal opponents of the ban, is satisfied.

"In politics, it's about striking the right balance to ensure you're protecting taxpayers and at the same time creating a greater opportunity to enjoy winter life," he said. "I think this strikes a pretty good balance."

The city implemented the bylaw banning tobogganing after a lawyer, Bruno Uggenti, won a $900,000 lawsuit against the city after he was injured while tobogganing.

Last winter, community members started holding tobogganing events to protest the ban. It's since been debated at the council table "at least seven times," said Coun. Sam Merulla of Ward 4 at the general issues committee on Wednesday.

The money to maintain designated hills is "the best money we've ever spent if we don't revisit this issue ever again," he said.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now