Headlines

Hamilton hockey player Brian McGrattan knocked out in brutal fight

Former NHLer Brian McGrattan was stretchered off the ice after a scary incident during a Tuesday AHL game between the San Diego Gulls and San Antonio Rampage.

Warning: graphic content

Former NHLer Brian McGrattan was stretchered off the ice after a scary incident during a Tuesday AHL game between the San Diego Gulls and San Antonio Rampage.

McGrattan, who made his career as an enforcer, fought Rampage player Daniel Maggio in the second period.

The two landed several severe blows, before Maggio nailed McGrattan with a right and knocked him out, sending him face first onto the ice.

Players immediately signaled for help, and the Hamilton-born resident was stretchered off the ice.

The Gulls tweeted Tuesday night that McGrattan was "conscious, alert and has full movement."

McGrattan was signed by the Anaheim Ducks in the off season after splitting time with the Calgary Flames and their AHL affiliate in Adirondack the last few seasons.

He was front and centre for one of the most notorious incidents of the 2014 season, as the guy holding back then Vancouver Canucks coach John Tortorella as he was trying to storm the Flames' dressing room after a much talked about line brawl.

McGrattan has also been very public about his partnership with the NHL's substance abuse program as a mentor for other players, and overcoming his own addictions.

The way I was living was not the way I wanted to live anymore," he told CBC News back in 2014. "There's only one way out of that and that's death. And I didn't want to die."

"I was a better fighter after I got clean. Not one day do I come to the rink and take a day off. I don't take anything for granted."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now