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Hamilton breaks cold record for 2nd day in a row

Hamilton smashed another cold record Wednesday, as temperatures plummeted for the second day in a row. It was -12.2 C at the Hamilton airport at 7 a.m., with a wind chill of -19 C. The previous lowest temperature set on this date was -9 C, set back in 1989.

-12.2 C at Hamilton airport at 7 a.m., with wind chill of -19 C

Temperatures in Hamilton have been unseasonably cold this week. (John Rieti/CBC)

Hamilton smashed another cold record Wednesday, as temperatures plummeted for the second day in a row.

It was -12.2 C at the Hamilton airport at 7 a.m., with a wind chill of -19 C. The previous lowest temperature set on this date was -9 C, set back in 1989.

The average minimum temperature for this time of year is just under the freezing mark at -0.9 C, while the average maximum is 6.2 C.

For anyone wondering, the highest temperature ever recorded on this date is a balmy 19 C back in 1985.

Expect increasing cloudiness on Wednesday, with snow beginning in the morning. About 5 cm is expected, with winds coming out of the southwest at 30 km/h gusting to 50 km/h.

The high is 0 C.

The snow should taper off late this evening to partly cloudy with a 40 per cent chance of flurries accumulating to 2 cm with a low of -6 C.

Temperatures are expected to warm up heading into the weekend, tipping over the 0 C mark from Saturday onwards.

As bad as things have been in Hamilton, they have been much worse in nearby Buffalo.

A ferocious storm dumped massive piles of snow on parts of upstate New York, trapping residents in their homes and stranding motorists on roadways, as temperatures in all 50 states fell to freezing or below.

Even hardened Buffalo residents were caught off-guard Tuesday as more than 150 centimetres fell in parts of the city by Wednesday morning. Authorities said snow totals by the afternoon could top 180 centimetres in the hardest-hit areas south of Buffalo, with another potential 30 to 60 centimetres expected by Thursday.

With files from the Associated Press

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