Hamilton

Hamilton faces 'modest' hiring climate next quarter, says survey

The ManpowerGroup survey found seven per cent of participants in Hamilton were planning to hire, another seven per cent were expecting cutbacks and 86 per cent anticipated staffing levels staying the same.
Plans to hire new employees in Hamilton are expected to drop during the fourth quarter of 2019, according to a new survey. (Mike Blake/Reuters)

Hamilton faces a "modest" hiring climate next quarter, according to a survey that found seven per cent of employers interviewed were anticipating cutbacks.

The ManpowerGroup Employment Outlook Survey for the fourth quarter of 2019 was put together following interviews with representatives of 1,930 employers in Canada.

Each participant was asked the following question:  "How do you anticipate total employment at your location to change in the three months to the end of December 2019 as compared to the current quarter?"

The survey also found seven per cent of participants in Hamilton were planning to hire, while 86 per cent anticipated staffing levels staying the same, said Erica Melarangeli, Ontario's southwest market leader for Manpower.

It's a drop of nine percentage points compared to the quarter before and a year-over-year comparison in the survey also reported hiring prospects plummeting by 13 percentage in Hamilton.

"There definitely is some up and down," said Melarangeli. 

"Walking into Q4 in 2018 the hiring trends were far more optimistic, she explained. "This is modest. It's not good, it's not bad, it's just things are levelling."

Hiring plans in Hamilton are less optimistic than the provincial average across all industries, where the survey found 13 per cent of employers were expecting to add staff, seven per cent were anticipating cutbacks, 79 per cent were planning to stay the same and one per cent said they didn't know.

Overall, the survey found Canadian employers were making conservative hiring plans for the fourth quarter of 2019, with 15 per cent predicting plans to increase staff, six per cent anticipating cutbacks and 78 per cent suggesting no change.

The findings were unchanged from the quarter before and remain "relatively stable" compared to the same time last year, says the survey.

The survey, which takes things like tourism and seasonal work into consideration, found the hiring outlook across the region was varied, according to Melarangeli.

In Niagara Falls the hiring climate was described as "cautious."

Seven per cent of employers reported they were planning to hire, 17 per cent anticipated cuts and 76 per cent said they expected staffing to stay the same.

Meanwhile, in St. Catharines, hiring trends are predicted to be "cautiously optimistic," with 10 per cent planning to hire and have cutbacks respectively and 80 per cent planning to remain at the same staffing levels.