Hamilton

Hamilton launches 12-month pilot of automated speed enforcement in school zones

Hamilton will activate its automated speed enforcement (ASE) cameras and start issuing tickets to speeding drivers beginning on Oct. 1, the city announced Wednesday.

City has identified a dozen ASE camera locations based on speed data it has captured

A sign hanging in a downtown Hamilton neighbourhood cautions drivers to slow down. As part of the one-year pilot, the city has identified 12 locations across Hamilton where ASE cameras will be placed. (Dan Taekema/CBC)

Hamilton will activate its automated speed enforcement (ASE) cameras and start issuing tickets to speeding drivers beginning on Oct. 1, the city announced Wednesday.

In a news release, the city said this is to help increase the safety of vulnerable road users in school zones and community safety zones.

"Our community's vision is for zero fatalities or serious accidents on our streets and roads," Mayor Fred Eisenberger said.

"That's why we are introducing automated speed enforcement in select school zones and community safety zones known for high levels of speeding.

"We believe this will increase driver awareness of posted speed limits and significantly decrease injuries and fatalities as a result of motor vehicle collisions. This will help to keep our neighbourhoods and roadways safe for everyone," Eisenberger said.

12 ASE camera locations across Hamilton

As part of the one-year pilot, the city has identified 12 locations across Hamilton based on speed data it has captured.

The city said ASE camera locations were selected based on data that indicates where speed and collisions have been a problem in community safety zones or schools zones.

Here are the 12 preferred sites for the automated speed enforcement program as part of the pilot project. (City of Hamilton)

There will be two cameras operating at one location at a time over the course of one year.

If a vehicle is detected travelling in excess of the posted speed limit in an ASE-enforced area, the registered owner of the vehicle will receive a ticket regardless of who was driving.

Offenders will be fined but demerit points will not be applied. Ticket holders should refer to the information on their ticket or visit the City of Hamilton's provincial offenses web page.

City will publish number of tickets issued at each location

Beginning in December, the city will publish program data, including the number of tickets issued at each location on a monthly basis.

According to the city, speeding is one of the largest contributing factors in the cause and severity of collisions. Pedestrians have a 41 per cent higher chance of survival if struck by a car driving 40 km/hr than a car driving 50 km/hr, the city says.

"Automated speed enforcement is just one of the contributing components in achieving our goal of Vision Zero in Hamilton," said Edward Soldo, director of transportation operations and maintenance.

"Engineering, education initiatives, police enforcement and the introduction of the ASE program in the city will increase the safety of our vulnerable populations in school zones and community safety zones."

In February 2019, Hamilton city council approved the Hamilton Strategic Road Safety Program and Vision Zero Action Plan that identified the need for reduced speed limits on local residential roadways and in designated school zones.

On Jan. 13, 2020, council directed staff to initiate the one-year automated speed enforcement pilot program.

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