Hamilton

Eating an egg a day isn't bad for your health: McMaster study

A team of researchers from the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences recently published a study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition which suggests eating one egg a day is OK.

Research team says small studies lacking diversity have fuelled contradictory theories

A team of McMaster University researchers suggest eating on egg a day will not worsen your health. (Justin Sullivan)

The mystery over eggs and their health effects may finally be cracked.

A team of researchers from the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences recently published a study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition which suggests eating one egg a day won't hurt you.

The group came to the conclusion after analyzing data from three long-term, multinational studies and looking for associations between eating eggs and mortality, cardiovascular disease and fats.

The three studies included about 177,000 individuals, 12,701 deaths and 13,658 cases of cardiovascular disease from 50 countries across 6 continents.

Mahshid Dehghan, one of the authors and a PHRI investigator, says, if people keep eating eggs at the rate they do now, they shouldn't see any health problems pop up because of it.

They found no correlation between eating one egg a day and an increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, mortality or blood cholesterol, even if people have a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes.

"There's no harm in consuming one egg a day," Dehghan tells CBC News.

"Egg are a rich source of high quality protein, minerals and aminos. The dietary guidelines recommendation is fewer than three eggs per week, but eggs are affordable and available ... The recommendation scared people and may affect the diet of less privileged participants."

The team points to small studies lacking diversity as the reason for contradictory evidence which suggest eating fewer than three eggs a week.

The authors, however, were unable to determine if the one egg a day averages out for some who might eat two or three eggs a couple times a week.

The study's key limitation is that it was an observational study, meaning the findings are rooted in correlation, rather than causation.

About the Author

Bobby Hristova

Reporter/Editor

Bobby Hristova is a reporter/editor with CBC Hamilton. Email: bobby.hristova@cbc.ca

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