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How does the COVID-19 vaccine work and how safe is it? CBC Asks an infectious disease scientist

join our live interview on Thursday at noon with Matthew Miller, an associate professor of infectious diseases and immunology at McMaster University in Hamilton. He'll take your questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Join our live interview on Thursday at noon on Facebook; send us your questions and comments

How does the COVID-19 vaccine work and how safe is it? CBC Asks an infectious disease scientist

CBC News Hamilton

1 month agoVideo
27:57
Matthew Miller, an associate professor of infectious diseases and immunology at McMaster University in Hamilton, takes your questions about the COVID-19 vaccine. 27:57
Live at noon on Thursday, CBC asks Matthew Miller, an associate professor of infectious diseases and immunology at McMaster University in Hamilton, all about the COVID-19 vaccine.
Matthew Miller is an associate professor of infectious diseases and immunology at McMaster University. (McMaster University)

Miller says the vaccine teaches human cells how to make one of the proteins of SARS-CoV-2 (the one it uses to attach to and enter our cells). After making that protein — which Miller said isn't dangerous or toxic to humans — the body learns what the virus does, which can prevent our cells from getting infected.

What are the long-term safety concerns? If we get the vaccine do we still have to socially distance and wear masks? What percentage of the population needs to be vaccinated in order for there to be herd immunity to protect those who can't get vaccinated?

We'll ask these questions and more during Miller's live interview with the CBC's Conrad Collaco.

What do you want to know about the vaccine? Let us know and we'll ask the expert. 

Be a part of our live chat. Send your questions and comments to us by email at Hamilton@cbc.ca or on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

 

 

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