Saskatchewan

Biodiesel Association aimed at Kyoto targets

Biodiesel fuel proponents are banding together to form a united front to government. The Biodiesel Association of Canada plans to make sure the industry has a significant say in any new government policy.

Biodiesel fuel proponents are banding together to form a united front to government. The Biodiesel Association of Canada plans to make sure the industry has a significant say in any new government policy.

Brad Hanmer, who grows canola near Govan, expects some of his crop will eventually be turned into biodiesel fuel since Canada's Kyoto commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is expected to create more demand for cleaner fuels.

"We are going to try and give a sales pitch to them that this is one of the possibilities to maintain the targets that we are committed to," he says.

As chair of the new association, Hanmer wants to get involved in everything from government policy to developing new markets.

According to him, half the canola acres in Saskatchewan could benefit from a vibrant biodiesel industry.

It isn't just canola growers who stand to benefit. Hanmer says livestock producers, especially beef producers, may find an unexpected market for some of their byproducts. He says using animal fats to create biodiesel could increase the value of carcasses.

Eventually Hanmer wants to see plants across North American producing biodiesel fuel from canola, soybean and animal fats.

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