Canada

Federal Conservatives issue appeal for donations

The governing Conservatives have stepped up fundraising efforts amid continuing talks by the opposition parties on forming a possible coalition to defeat the newly re-elected minority government.

The Conservatives have stepped up fundraising efforts amid continuing talks by the opposition parties on forming a possible coalition to defeat the newly re-elected minority government.

On Saturday night, Irving Gerstein, chairman of the Conservative Fund Canada,  sent out an urgent appeal for donations of $100 and $200.

The e-mail was titled: "The privilege to govern must be earned, not taken."

It said the opposition Liberal party was "completely rejected" by Canadians in the last election, held Oct. 14, and it's now trying to seize power through the back door.

"As you read this letter, the Liberals are holding secret negotiations with the socialist NDP and the separatist Bloc Québécois to overturn the wishes of Canadian voters and take power," the e-mail says.

"They want to take power and impose on Canadians a prime minister without a personal mandate, a Liberal-NDP coalition not one voter has ever endorsed and have it all backstopped by the separatist Bloc Québécois, who simply want to destroy the country.

"We need your help to ensure that they do not succeed!"

No-confidence vote planned

Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's economic update was issued last Thursday, sparking opposition plans for a no-confidence motion that could bring down the government.

On Sunday, Liberal MP Michael Ignatieff took issue with the government's argument that the opposition parties don't have the support of Canadians.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper "has had three attempts at a majority government," Ignatieff said. "Sixty per cent of the Canadian people did not support his party [in the Oct. 14 vote].

"What Canadians expected of their prime minister is that he would reach out across the floor, find a moderate, sensible, practical, common-sensical approach to Canada’s economic problems."

As he delivered his economic update, Flaherty also said the Conservatives would end public financing for political parties, a move that would hurt the opposition Liberals, New Democrats and BQ.

But on Saturday, the Conservatives shelved their plan to eliminate the political financing rules that give parties $1.95 for each vote they receive in a general election.

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