Edmonton

Travis Vader to appeal manslaughter convictions for McCanns' deaths Nov. 30

Alberta’s highest court will hear Travis Vader’s appeal of his manslaughter convictions for killing St. Albert seniors Lyle and Marie McCann in late November.

Now serving life sentence, Vader has always denied involvement in deaths of St. Albert seniors

The Alberta Court of Appeal will hear Travis Vader's appeal of his two manslaughter convictions on Nov. 30. (Amber Bracken/Canadian Press )

Alberta's highest court will hear Travis Vader's appeal of his manslaughter convictions for killing St. Albert seniors Lyle and Marie McCann in late November.

Vader's appeal will be heard Nov. 30 in Edmonton, a spokesperson for Alberta Courts said Friday.

Vader was sentenced in January to life in prison for killing the couple, who were last seen alive in July 2010. Their bodies have never been found.

Vader's defence lawyers filed a notice of appeal two days after the sentence was handed down.

At the time, defence counsel Brian Beresh outlined a dozen grounds for appeal, ranging from what he called the "undue delay perpetrated by the police and the Crown" to the fact that a life sentence was "demonstrably unfit" for the crime of manslaughter.

Lyle and Marie McCann were last seen alive in July 2010. Their bodies have never been found. (Supplied)

Lyle McCann, 78, and Marie McCann, 77, were beginning a road trip to B.C. on July 3, 2010, when they disappeared after stopping at a gas station in St. Albert.

Their burned-out RV was found two days later at a campsite near Edson.

Vader, then 38, was arrested two weeks later at a home near Niton Junction, on outstanding warrants not tied to the case.

He has consistently denied killing the couple. During his December 2017 sentencing hearing, he argued his rights had been violated while in custody.

He also alleged the RCMP used excessive force while arresting him and that he had been beaten up by guards at the Edmonton Remand Centre.

Vader was originally convicted of two counts of second-degree murder.

But after it was discovered that Court of Queen's Bench Justice Denny Thomas had relied on a section of the Criminal Code that had been ruled unconstitutional, Thomas downgraded the convictions to manslaughter.

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