Edmonton

Deal between B.C. Greens and NDP changes nothing on pipeline, Hoffman says

Deputy Premier Sarah Hoffman says Alberta will keep pushing for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion despite a deal that would have the NDP and the Green party working together in B.C.

'As far as I'm concerned, the federal government has the authority to approve pipelines'

Alberta Deputy Premier Sarah Hoffman said her government is confident the federal approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline will not be disrupted by B.C. politics. (Scott Neufeld/CBC)

Deputy Premier Sarah Hoffman says Alberta will keep pushing for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion despite a deal that would have the NDP and Green party working together in B.C.

On Monday, Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver and B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan said they had reached a four-year deal to vote together on budget and confidence matters in the B.C. legislature.

Both parties are opposed to the expansion of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby.

Weaver said the co-operation plan, which won't become public until it is ratified by the B.C. NDP caucus, contains a provision on the controversial project.

Despite these developments, Hoffman repeated her government's line that nothing has changed.

"As far as I'm concerned, the federal government has the authority to approve pipelines. They've made that decision and our pipeline is moving forward," she said.

Wildrose Leader Brian Jean told reporters Monday that governments in British Columbia should not interfere with Alberta's interests. (Scott Neufeld/CBC)

Wildrose Leader Brian Jean said Premier Rachel Notley needs to show her support for Alberta by firing Tzeporah Berman and Karen Mahone, members of the province's Oil Sands Advisory Panel.

He says both women have supported the NDP and the Green Party in the past.

"Premier Notley needs to send a strong message that this can no longer be tolerated, that governments in British Columbia and elsewhere around the country cannot block Alberta's pipelines and our interests," he said.

Jean said he hopes Notley will forge a better relationship with the new B.C. government than she had with the B.C. Liberals.

Next steps

Christy Clark remains the premier of British Columbia. Clark said in a statement Monday that she will consult with her caucus on what she should do next. 

Clark could resign, hold another election, or deliver a throne speech that will face a confidence vote. 

Horgan and Weaver hope the lieutenant-governor will let them form a government if Clark's Liberals are defeated in a confidence vote.

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