Edmonton

Edmonton wildlife rescue seeks bigger pool for orphaned beaver

Staff at an Edmonton wildlife rehabilitation centre are looking for a bigger pool to keep a resident beaver busy.

Sawyer the beaver has doubled in size since arriving at WILDNorth in November

WILDNorth, a wildlife rescue and rehabilitation facility, is looking for donations to help care for animals like Sawyer, a baby beaver, who needs to stay on-site over the winter. 1:06

Staff at an Edmonton wildlife rehabilitation centre are looking for a bigger pool to keep a resident beaver busy.

Sawyer the beaver arrived at the WILDNorth wildlife hospital in November. She was brought in after someone spotted her crossing a highway near Wetaskiwin, dragging her hind legs.

The rodent has doubled in size since then, said Kim Blomme, director of wildlife services.

Staff originally thought Sawyer was male, and continue to learn new things about the beaver.

"I definitely can see where the expression busy as a beaver comes from, because she is very busy all the time. Except for she has little periods where she has naps and such," Blomme said.

"When we're cleaning the pool, when she hears the water running then she does what beavers do and tries to dam things up. It's pretty interesting."

Sawyer spends her days frolicking in the pool and rearranging the twigs, branches and artificial turf in her enclosure. The pool, an oblong metal horse trough, is getting too small for her.

Staff are hoping someone out there might have a pool that better-suits the growing beaver.

Sawyer needs a round pool about four feet in diameter and a foot to a foot and a half deep. It has to be metal, because she'll chew through anything else.

She does spend a fair amount of time in that pool.- Kim Blomme, WILDNorth Director of Wildlife Services

"We don't want it too, too deep just yet because she's still a youngin'," Blomme said.

"We still want something that she can get in and out of fairly easily, but just something that will give her a little bit more circumference to just be able to swim around. Because she does spend a fair amount of time in that pool."

Staff will retrofit the new pool with a drain to make cleaning it easier.

Sawyer will stay at WILDNorth for at least the next year, Blomme said. After that, the goal is to reintroduce her to the wild.

"We're at some point going to need a landowner who is willing to have a beaver on their property, too," Blomme said.

Anyone with a suitable pool for Sawyer is asked to contact WILDNorth.