Edmonton

Privatization of long-term care a flawed policy, report says

A new report by the Parkland Institute is calling on the Alberta government to reverse its policy of allowing for-profit companies to run the province’s long-term care homes.
Shannon Stunden Bower from the Parkland Institute is one of the authors of the report. (CBC)

A new report by the Parkland Institute calls on the Alberta government to reverse its policy of allowing for-profit companies to run the province’s long-term care homes.

“From Bad to Worse: Residential elder care in Alberta” found that these facilities are understaffed by 90 minutes of care per resident each day.

“That’s an hour and a half of care missing every day in for-profit facilities for Alberta residents in care,” said Parkland Institute research director Shannon Stunden Bower, who wrote the report with David Campanella. 

Stunden Bower says the province needs to recognize that using private companies to run seniors homes is a flawed policy. 

“Privatization does not seem to be the way to go if you’re interested in quality of care for Alberta elders,” she said.

Stunden Bower says the Alberta government should mandate increased staffing levels in for-profit facilities, and join other provinces in pushing Ottawa to publicly fund long-term care for seniors.


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