Edmonton

Photo radar revenue will go toward community projects

Money from your next speeding fine will go toward traffic safety and community initiatives, after council approved a new photo radar policy. A reserve fund has been created to control how the fine money is spent.

Council approves new reserve fund to control ticket money

Council created a new reserve fund to create more transparency around the use of photo radar revenue.

Money from your next speeding fine will go toward traffic safety and community initiatives, after council approved a new photo radar policy.

A reserve fund has been created to control how the money is spent.

Until now, any money made off photo radar was funnelled directly to the transportation department.

Mayor Don Iveson first pitched the idea for a reserve fund in October as a way to dispel the impression that council was collecting fines to line the city coffers.

Mayor Don Iveson says the photo radar reserve fun will let the public hold council accountable for money collected from fines. (CBC)
He said the new reserve will allow the public to hold their elected officials accountable.

“The public and council will always see where that money goes. Every dollar will be a decision of council, as opposed to something left to the transportation department.”

According to the new policy, the money will be used to fund traffic safety initiatives by the city and the police. Any leftover cash will be given to third-party community groups for one-time infrastructure grants.

Coun. Michael Oshry was the only council member to vote against the reserve fund. He said it amounts to a shell game that lets council move the money around. He wanted to see it go into general revenue.

“I think it’s up to council to justify the program, to justify the revenue, and justify where we’re going to spend the money. We should have the right to allocate it anywhere we can justify it,” Oshry said.

The city collected $9.9 million more than expected from photo radar fines this year. That money will be transferred into the new reserve fund.

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