Edmonton

Crumbling Edmonton roads, sidewalks to cost taxpayers $31 each per year

A tax levy for neighbourhood renewal is returning to Edmontonians’ property taxes after a one-year hiatus.

'If citizens expect this infrastructure, there is no other way to pay for it'

The neighbourhood renewal program, replacing crumbling roads and sidewalks in aging Edmonton neighbourhoods, is expected to cost the city about $170 million a year. (CBC)

A tax levy for neighbourhood renewal is returning to Edmontonians' property taxes after a one-year hiatus.

The levy will be 1.5 per cent for 2017, 1.4 per cent in 2018.

That will amount to $31 for the average household next year.

The neighbourhood renewal program, replacing crumbling roads and sidewalks in aging Edmonton neighbourhoods, is expected to cost the city about $170 million a year.  

The city had hoped to qualify for grants from either the province or the federal government but were unsuccessful.

In 2015, council agreed to lift the tax levy for one year to help ease the property tax hike during tough economic times.

But Mayor Don Iveson said the levy is needed to keep the program on pace.

"We're facing reality with this recommendation," he said. "If citizens expect this infrastructure, there is no other way to pay for it."

There are over 300 neighbourhoods in Edmonton that require renewal, which is expected to be completed by 2039.