Edmonton

Murals replace graffiti along Kinnaird Ravine trail

Edmonton's Kinnaird Ravine is now home to one of the largest public art installations in the city in years.

Project aims to bring at-risk youth and the larger community together through art

A member of the KinnArt Ravine Project erects one of 62 murals along the Kinnaird Ravine trail Saturday. (CBC)

Edmonton's Kinnaird Ravine is now home to one of the largest public art installations the city has ever seen.

More than 60 murals went up Saturday on the dingy, graffiti-laden retaining walls along the ravine's gravel trail.

The murals were created by inner-city youth.

Sheets of plywood were dropped off at social agencies like Boyle Street Community Services and iHuman Youth Society with one request — paint something.

Sebastian Berrera, co-ordinator of the KinnArt Ravine Project, said he wanted to give at-risk youth a chance to make something for their community.

"The value of this project is community building," he said. "If we teach young kids and we bring the whole community together to work through art to develop healthy communities, we will have a better Edmonton.

"We worked together talking about topics like muralism. What is graffiti? What is muralism? And how we can express an opinion with pieces of art."

The murals will be displayed at least until spring.

Formerly known as Rat Creek Ravine, the trail runs from the river valley up to the Stadium LRT station.

To hear more about the project listen here as Berrera speaks with Edmonton AM radio host Mark Connolly about the inspiration behind exhibit.

See more of the murals below.

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