Edmonton·Video

Convoy rolls through Edmonton marking year since MMIWG report released

A convoy from Edmonton’s Borden Park to the Alberta Legislature will take place this morning to mark the one-year anniversary — and an absence of action since then — of a report that offered more than 200 recommendations relating to  murdered and missing Indigenous women in Canada.

Federal government efforts to move on calls to action delayed by pandemic

Convoy rallies for MMIWG

2 years ago
Duration 2:07
A year after the final report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, Edmonton activists are calling for action.

A convoy travelled from Edmonton's Borden Park to the Alberta Legislature Wednesday, marking the one-year anniversary — and an absence of action since then — of a report that offered more than 200 recommendations relating to murdered and missing Indigenous women in Canada.

"We're just going to shout it out, get it out there," Stephanie Harpe, an event organizer and who spoke as a witness to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, told CBC Radio's Edmonton AM on Wednesday.

"[People] can go to the national inquiry website, look at the 231 calls to action, see how you can implement that in your business, your life, our friends. That conversation — when we're not in the room — that's meaningful to us."

The inquiry delivered its final report June 3, 2019, concluding that decades of systemic racism and human-rights violations had contributed to the deaths and disappearances of hundreds of Indigenous women and girls.

The Stolen Sisters & Brothers Action Movement organized a convoy in Edmonton last June to safely protest the lack of action undertaken by Ottawa since the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls released its final report. (Travis McEwan/CBC)

The report said it constituted a genocide.

The federal government has postponed its long-awaited action plan because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The unveiling of the strategy was expected to coincide with the anniversary of the report.

Harpe's mother Ruby Ann MacDonald was murdered in Edmonton in 1999, a case that remains unsolved.

She is also a survivor of domestic abuse, a topic she has spoken on during a Ted Talk as well to 31 Indigenous communities last year.

Stephanie Harpe has helped organize Wednesday's convoy in Edmonton to mark the one-year anniversary of the report's release. (Brad Crowfoot)

The convoy started in the parking lot at Borden Park Road and 78th Street at about 11 a.m.

People were asked to remain in their vehicles and to set up in a drive-in theatre style. The convoy was escorted by event organizers through downtown Edmonton to the legislature grounds.

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