Edmonton·Video

Drone brings latest technology to traffic investigations

Police are using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to gather evidence at accident scenes.

UAV allows officers to measure and examine tire marks, distances and lines of sight

Constable Binoy Prabha of the Edmonton Police Service shows off the traffic department's drone to members of the media. It's being used to reconstruct serious collision scenes. 1:12

Police are turning to sky-high technology to improve their investigations of traffic collisions.

They’re now using an unmanned aerial vehicle to gather evidence at accident scenes.

The drone is equipped with a flight data recorder, search light, thermal imaging, and a remote-controlled digital camera. (EPS)
“The UAV provides aerial data for collision reconstruction and effective courtroom testimony,” said Const. Binoy Prabhu, in a news release.

The UAV will allow investigators to better measure and examine tire marks, distances and lines of sight, he said.

Police began to consider drones in January 2014 and received permission from Transport Canada six months later.

The drone gives a bird's eye view of a traffic collision. (EPS)
So far the drone has been used in over 15 major collision investigations in the City of Edmonton.

The drone can remain in the air for about 12 minutes and has a range of nearly 700 metres.

It is equipped with a flight data recorder, search light, thermal imaging, and a remote-controlled digital camera.

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