Conservative Dane Lloyd wins Sturgeon River-Parkland byelection

The federal riding of Sturgeon River-Parkland remains a Conservative stronghold after residents voted overwhelming for Dane Lloyd in a byelection Monday night.

Former parliamentary assistant takes 77 per cent of the vote

Dane Lloyd, 26, is a military reservist and former parliamentary assistant for St. Albert-Edmonton Conservative MP Michael Cooper. (CBC)

The federal riding of Sturgeon River-Parkland remains a Conservative stronghold, after residents voted overwhelming for Dane Lloyd in a byelection Monday night.

Lloyd won 77 per cent of the vote. The nearest contender was Liberal candidate Brian Gold, who got 12 per cent.

A military reservist, Lloyd takes over the riding from Rona Ambrose, the former interim Conservative Party of Canada leader, who stepped down earlier this year.

Lloyd, 26,e worked as a parliamentary assistant for St. Albert-Edmonton Conservative MP Michael Cooper.

During his victory speech at a restaurant in Stony Plain, Lloyd launched into federal campaign mode.

"We will take the fight to Justin Trudeau and the Liberals in Ottawa," Lloyd told a crowd of volunteers and supporters.

He also touched on points he campaigned on: getting pipelines built; lower taxes; and pushing for a law where convicted murderers would be ineligible for parole unless they reveal the locations of victims' bodies.

"I will not rest until Canadians get the government that they deserve, a government that puts victims of crime and their families first."
Conservative Dane Lloyd talks to supporters at a victory party in Stony Plain on Monday night. (CBC)

He said he will continue the Conservatives' battle against the government's changes to small business taxes.

Other candidates who ran in the byelection included Ernest Chauvet from the Christian Heritage Party and Shawna Gawreluck of the New Democrats.

The byelection had a 24-per-cent voter turnout. Just under 88,000 people were eligible to cast ballots, according to Elections Canada.

Lloyd said he's looking forward to heading back to Ottawa, where he plans to voice his constituents concerns to the Liberal government.