Edmonton

Canadian soldier dead, shot during live-fire exercise at Alberta base

A Canadian soldier died after being shot during a live-fire training exercise at CFB Wainwright late Friday, according to the Department of National Defence.

Military police are in charge of investigation, National Defence Department says

Canadian Forces Base Wainwright in Alberta, where a soldier was killed during a live fire exercise late Friday. About 700 people are based at CFB Wainwright, located about 200 kilometres southeast of Edmonton. (CBC)

A Canadian soldier died after being shot during a live-fire training exercise at CFB Wainwright late Friday, according to the Department of National Defence.

The soldier was shot during an exercise at the base in Wainwright, Alta., at about 10 p.m. on Friday, the department said in a statement on Saturday. Wainwright is about 200 kilometres southeast of Edmonton.

The soldier was treated and first transported to hospital in Wainwright and was then flown to hospital in Edmonton, where they died early Saturday morning, the department said.

The exercise was suspended and an investigation is underway. A spokesperson confirmed that military police are in charge of the investigation, and said that about 700 people are based at CFB Wainwright.

Gen. Jonathan Vance, chief of the defence staff, said on Twitter that the soldier's name will be released once family members are notified. He offered condolences to family and friends, as well as to the 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group, 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and the Royal Westminster Regiment.

Vance said the soldier is male, but the Department of National Defence has yet to confirm the identity.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shared condolences to the family on social media on Saturday. 

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan also extended his sympathies to the family.

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