If you're travelling to Turkey, better check your insurance coverage

After the recent coup attempt in Turkey, the Canadian government has issued an advisory to avoid non-essential travel to the country, a move that could cause travellers with insurance to lose their coverage.

With a travel advisory in place, those with tickets should check the fine print before heading out

Turkish soldiers secure the area, as supporters of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan protest in Istanbul's Taksim square, early Saturday, July 16, 2016. (Emrah Gurel/Associated Press)

After the recent coup attempt in Turkey, the Canadian government has issued an advisory to avoid non-essential travel to the country, a move that could cause travellers with insurance to lose their coverage.

According to a Canadian insurance company, most travel insurance has exclusion clauses that kick in if a government issued travel advisory is in place. 

Robin Ingle is the CEO of Ingle International, and said travellers should make sure they know exactly what they're getting themselves into. 

"Some will provide no coverage whatsoever if there's an incident like in Turkey or in Nice," he said. "They'll say 'stop, you know we're not providing coverage if there's a warning, and we're not gonna provide coverage at this time if there is trouble going on.' "

Covered or not?

Moutaz Elkorashy of Citadel Tours said Calgarians should keep a close eye on travel advisories. 

"No one is going to stop you from buying travel insurance, but always the debate: am I covered or am I not?"

Ingle said the other option is to cancel and get a refund, something he says most travel agencies and tour guides offer in their insurance packages.