Calgary

Trevor Kloschinsky found not criminally responsible for slaying of peace officer

Trevor Kloschinsky has been found not criminally responsible for the death of retired RCMP officer Rod Lazenby two years ago.

Retired RCMP officer Rod Lazenby was killed after going to dog breeder's home south of Calgary in 2012

Trevor Kloschinsky, who was charged with first-degree murder in the death of peace officer Rod Lazenby, has been found not criminally responsible. (Stuart Gradon/Calgary Herald)

Trevor Kloschinsky has been found not criminally responsible for the death of retired RCMP officer Rod Lazenby two years ago​.

Kloschinsky, 49, was charged with first-degree murder in the 2012 death of Lazenby, a retired RCMP officer responsible for enforcing bylaws in the Municipal District of Foothills near Calgary.

Lazenby, 62, died after going to Kloschinsky's property near Priddis on Aug. 10, 2012, to investigate an animal complaint.

High River peace officer Rod Lazenby was killed while on duty in August 2012. (M.D. of Foothills)

An autopsy found Lazenby was strangled and had 56 abrasions, contusions and lacerations to the face, head, neck, body and back. He also suffered numerous internal injuries.

Court of Queen's Bench Justice Beth Hughes ruled that Kloschinsky's mental state prevented him from understanding the consequences of his actions.

Court heard that Kloschinsky, who bred dogs for a living, thought Lazenby was stealing his animals and strangled him.

However, a psychiatrist testified the dog breeder was actively psychotic and probably did not realize he was doing something wrong.

Kloschinsky admitted causing Lazenby's death. He acknowledged dropping the officer off, handcuffed and unconscious, at a southeast Calgary police station where he told officers he had apprehended a "dog thief."

Hughes said that while Kloschinsky has improved dramatically since he first appeared in court, it is obvious he still suffers from a mental disorder.

Kloschinsky will have to appear before the Alberta Review Board within 45 days to determine how long he will stay at the Southern Alberta Forensic Psychiatric Hospital.

Outside the courts centre, Lazenby's daughter Meghan McLean said the family does not feel justice has been served.

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