Calgary

Supreme Court of Canada won't hear appeals of couple who murdered Calgary dad over child visitation dispute

The Supreme Court of Canada won't hear the appeals of an Alberta couple convicted of first-degree murder.

Sheena Cuthill and her husband Timothy Rempel were found guilty 3 years ago of killing Ryan Lane

Ryan Lane, 24, was killed after he was kidnapped from a parking lot in the city's northwest. (Submitted by Ryan Lane's family)

The Supreme Court of Canada won't hear the appeals of an Alberta couple convicted of first-degree murder.

Sheena Cuthill and her husband Timothy Rempel were found guilty three years ago of killing Ryan Lane, who had a child with Cuthill before the two parted ways.

Cuthill's brother-in-law was also convicted in the murder plot, and all three guilty parties were sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.

Testimony at the trial indicated Cuthill and her husband were unhappy that Lane wanted visitation rights with the child he fathered with Cuthill.

Wilhelm Rempel, Sheena Cuthill and Tim Rempel murdered Ryan Lane because he wanted visitation rights with the daughter he and Cuthill shared. (CBC/Global)

Lane's remains were found in a burn barrel about 70 kilometres northeast of Calgary months after he was last seen going to meet someone who said they could help with the custody dispute.

The Supreme Court, following its usual custom, gave no reason for refusing to hear the appeals of Cuthill and Rempel.

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