Calgary

Stampede revellers reminded to stay safe at boozy parties

The Calgary Stampede can mean a week of heavy drinking for many hard-core partiers. But police and emergency officials are warning people to exercise some caution.

Balance alcohol consumption with water and watch out for people drugging drinks, police say

Police and emergency officials are reminding Stampede revellers to exercise caution at the many alcohol-fuelled parties around the city. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

The Calgary Stampede can mean a week of heavy drinking for many hard-core partiers.

But police and emergency officials are warning people to exercise some caution.

The combination of booze and heat can be a dangerous one on the Stampede grounds, so it's important to pace yourself, says Calgary EMS spokeswoman Naomi Nania.

"Unfortunately it's Stampede, so we know alcohol will be consumed, we're just warning people to be aware of the fact that alcohol is something that will dehydrate you," she said.

"So while you're drinking alcohol, we know it's going to happen so make sure you're also trying to drink water as well."

Most of the time, the worst side-effect is a bad hangover. 

But Stampede goers should also be aware of their surroundings, stick with friends and look out for people trying to drug their drinks, says Calgary Police Service Insp. Leah Barber.

"Just be cognizant, if you're not feeling well, if something's wrong, you need to respond to that right away," she said.

"And hopefully you have your buddy with you so you can say 'I don't feel well I need to go home'. So that way you can get home safely."

The Stampede starts with Sneak-a-Peek on Thursday night.

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