Calgary

Stampede 101 introduces newcomers to the 'Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth'

A group of newcomers in northeast Calgary learned Thursday all about the event that bills itself as "Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth" — and how to take part in what will be, for many of them, their first Stampede.

'It's to help them nurture that connection to Calgary,' Immigrant Services Calgary co-ordinator says

Stampede Princess Jenna Peters and First Nations Princess Sikapinakii Low Horn were in attendance at Stampede 101 on Thursday. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)

A group of newcomers in northeast Calgary learned Thursday all about the event that bills itself as the "Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth" — and how to take part in what will be, for many of them, their first Stampede.

Called Stampede 101, the event was held by the Calgary Stampede and Immigrant Services Calgary at the Marlborough Community Association.

It featured lessons including how to wear a belt buckle, the difference between a yeehaw and a yahoo, and a rundown on this year's midway menus.

"I've never seen so many varieties of international and Canadian food combined — fried," said Sergio Rivas, who is from Chile and came to Calgary two months ago.

"I'm looking forward to everything."

'Sense of belonging'

Stampede 101 started during the pandemic, and 2022 represents the first year it has been held in person instead of online.

That meant in-classroom visits from Stampede mascot Harry the Horse, Stampede Princess Jenna Peters and First Nations Princess Sikapinakii Low Horn.

Stampede 101 featured a visit from Stampede mascot Harry the Horse and lessons including how to wear a belt buckle, the difference between a yee-haw and a yahoo, and a rundown on this year's midway menus. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)

It's intended to be a primer for the Stampede. Rebeca Andrada, an outreach co-ordinator with Immigrant Services Calgary, says it helps new Calgarians feel included and connected.

"It's to help them nurture that connection to Calgary, that connection to the city, and to grow that sense of belonging," Andrada said.

Marcela Aquea said she had been to the Stampede before the pandemic, but learned a lot at Thursday's session. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)

Marcela Aquea had been to the Stampede before the pandemic, but said she hadn't known a lot of what she learned at the session.

"It was wonderful," Aquea said.

"I'm really looking forward to taking my children, so they can see all the animals and they can experience the parade and be part of this beautiful event."

The 2022 Calgary Stampede kicks off on July 8.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Hannah Kost

Online Journalist/Associate Producer

Hannah Kost is an award-winning journalist from Calgary, Alta. She joined the CBC in 2019 as an online journalist and associate producer.

With files from Dan McGarvey

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