Calgary

Video shows grinning semi-truck driver hit Alberta animal rights demonstrator

Advocate Kattrina Horner is part of the Red Deer Animal Save group and says the incident, which happened on Aug. 19 near the Olymel facility, has caused her a great deal of shock.

Driver was fined for failing to yield to pedestrian

Kattrina Horner, an animal rights advocate, says being struck by a semi-trailer affected her physically and mentally. (Kattrina Horner)

A video shows a semi driver smiling after seeming to intentionally strike an animal rights demonstrator with his vehicle in Alberta last month.

Advocate Kattrina Horner is part of the Red Deer Animal Save group and says the incident, which happened on Aug. 19 near the Olymel facility, has caused her a great deal of shock.

"I just I really felt that it was intentional — what he had done," said Horner.

The driver that hit Kattrina Horner was issued a ticket for failing to yield to a pedestrian. (Kattrina Horner)

Horner explains she was crossing the street so that she could get a good picture of the semi-trailer carrying the animals, but as she was crossing the street the semi struck her.

In a video captured by a friend, the driver drove off smiling and waving after he crossed the intersection.

RCMP say the driver was issued a fine for failing to yield to a pedestrian, which resulted in a $776 ticket. Police did not release the driver's identity.

CBC News has edited the video to remove a segment which contains profanity from a bystander. Watch the video of the incident below:

Advocate Kattrina Horner is part of the Red Deer Animal Save group and says the incident, which happened on Aug. 19 near Olymel Cornwall Bacon Plant, has caused her a great deal of shock. 0:12

While Horner's injuries have been acute, she says she's had ongoing physiotherapy for her back and shoulder and recently booked an appointment with a mental health worker.

"I don't like being around big trucks anymore, which is unfortunate because I will continue to go and pay my respects to the animals and still live through the mental scars of what happened," she said.

Horner says she and her group hold vigils and pay their respects to the animals being killed.

"More and more people are coming and I have families wanting to come and say goodbye. But you know I've had to turn them down because of aggressive driving and drivers," she said.

Since the accident, Horner has gone back to continue her demonstrations and say good-bye to the animals.

The group, Red Deer Animal Save, holds vigils to animals being slaughtered. (Kattrina Horner)

"The second time I did go back I told everybody to try to avoid using the crosswalks as much as possible," she explained.

"We're just hoping that the companies can help us with our paying respects to the animals and not have to deal with public scrutiny or dangerous driving."