Calgary

SAIT donates batch of 3D-printed face shields for front-line COVID-19 responders

SAIT is donating 400 face shields made with a 3D printer to a group that will distribute them to front-line health-care workers in Alberta who need them during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vacant mechanical engineering technology lab used to make 400 shields

SAIT is donating its first batch of 3D-printed face shields to Helping Alberta, and plans to produce another 600. (Terri Trembath/CBC)

SAIT is donating 400 face shields made with a 3D printer to a group that will distribute them to health-care workers on the front line in Alberta who need them during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The school's department of applied research and innovation services (ARIS) used its state-of-the-art mechanical engineering technology lab — which was unused because of the pandemic shutdown — to manufacture the face shields. 

"We had the people, tools and resources to make it happen," said Jim Szautner, dean of SAIT's School of Manufacturing and Automation, and the School of Transportation.

"As the city starts to reopen, it is even more critical to have equipment like this ready and available for those who need it — we want to continue to be proactive and help in any way we can." 

SAIT's applied research and innovation services department utilized its mechanical engineering technology lab to manufacture the face shields using 3D printing technology. (Terri Trembath/CBC)

The school says it plans to make 600 more of the shields and donate them, too.

SAIT is working with volunteer-based Helping Alberta to get the new personal protective equipment (PPE) to the workers who need it. 

"PPE such as face shields are essential to help protect our front-line workers from the spread of COVID-19, yet many facilities who serve our vulnerable populations do not have access to it," said the group's executive director, Melissa LaMothe.

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